Reviews


Amazon Kindle (Wi-Fi) 3rd Generation Review (2010)

The Good:

Fantastic, slim, compact design (more below), Only weighs 8.5 ounces, Solid build, Improved Pearl E-Ink screen with higher contrast and faster page turns, New built-in PDF reader, with new dictionary lookup, notes, and highlights, and support for password-protected PDFs. (PDFs look fantastic), Wi-Fi (802.11b or 802.11g no 802.11n unfortunately), Great built-in keyboard for notes, 4 GB (3.3 usable) of internal memory capable of storing 3,500 electronic books, Eight font sizes with three font types, Excellent battery life, Easy user interface, Large library of e-books, newspapers, magazines, and blogs from Amazon

The Fine (Quirks/Problems):

Ok, MP3 player, Screen size is a little bit too small for graphics heavy PDFs, Backside of Kindle is a smudge magnet, Hair can get trapped in the sides of the screen since there is a small gap, Once you update to latest software beta, there is no option to revert back to older build. Which is inconvenient especially if the latest beta has problems

The Bad:

No expansion slot for adding more memory (but 4 GB is enough for the average user), No support for EPUB book files (library books), Battery is sealed into the device and isn’t user removable

The Bottom Line:

The third-generation Kindle is the best Kindle yet with a lower price ($139 for the Wi-Fi model), improved E-Ink screen with faster page turns, better battery life, and lighter weight makes it a fantastic E-Reader and possibly the best in its class. It makes a fabulous gift. If I were to give this a rating, it would a 9/10. The Kindle has some quirks as of now. But I am positive that future software updates can fix them.

Questions:

If you have any questions about the Kindle, post a comment and I will get back to you as soon as I can.

Review:

I have to admit that when I bought the Kindle it was an absolute impulse buy. Why not at $139? A week later, I received the eco-friendly frustration-free packaging. Ok, it was a brown box. Side Note: The retail packaging for the Kindle is just a sleeve over the brown box. In it was a printed quick-start guide, USB charger, USB cable and the Kindle itself. I tried using the USB charger to charge my iPod nano to no avail.

This first thing I noticed about the Kindle was that it was super light. There was already half a charge but I plugged it into my MacBook and waited about an hour till it fully charged. Then, selected my Wi-Fi network and the Kindle automatically registered. Out of the box, the Kindle is not yet registered. But the moment you connect it to a Wi-Fi network it begins to register.

For a case, I am using a 6×9 bubble envelope. It makes a decent low-budget  slipcase providing scratch protection until you remove it for use. (More in a later article.)

Some of you were asking about the size of the Kindle. It is slightly smaller than a DVD box and half as thin.

After about playing an hour with the device, I was immediately fluent in the interface. It is that simple to use. But when I showed it to my fellow colleagues, their first instinct was to touch the screen. And when I handed them the Kindle they first used the 5-way navigation pad to try to turn the screen.

On the topic of Wi-Fi vs 3G, I was fine just purchasing the Wi-Fi version since I mostly download the books from Amazon.com then transfer it to my Kindle via computer. But 3G can be handy if you are a frequent traveler.

My original concern with the Kindle was whether the refresh rate would be too slow. It is not. When you are close to the end of the page, you know when to turn the page like an instinct.

The new WebKit browser’s more useable and more Web pages will display properly formatted. But using the navigation button to jump from link to link on a Web page can become a little tedious.

The Amazon collection of eBooks is absolutely fantastic. The first books I got were Sherlock Holmes, Common Sense, and Pride and Prejudice. All of theme were free books. Amazon has a collection of 16,482 Free Classics. Most books I saw were at $9.99 and some even lower.

 

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